Batterierberg @ Saatchi Gallery in London, February 28th, 2015 »

On the 28th of February 2015, the Saatchi Gallery opened its doors for a prestigious private event by Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate. On the three stories of the gallery, producing wineries presented their wines under the theme: “Icon Wines of the World” as part of the global “A Matter of Taste” tasting series by Robert Parker. The wines presented on this day had been awarded at least 90 Parker Points by the Robert Parker tasting team.

Immich-Batterieberg, among others from Germany, presented its Riesling wines from three different vintages. The doors at Saatchi Gallery opened at 11 am and the wine enthusiasts were able to taste and chat with the winemakers from all over the world until 6 pm.

mass_media

Our stand was located in the „Riesling-Room“ were we shared space with Selbach-Oster, JJ Prüm and St. Urbans Hof. We were surrounded by art from Keith Haring, which created a modern and inspirational atmosphere for a wine tasting.

gallerie_1

From our side, Gernot, as always, presented our wines while Fay and Roland introduced Immich-Batterieberg to a wider audience.

gallerie_2

Our tasting had three different wines in stock:

  • 2009 Batterieberg 93 PP
  • 2011 Ellergrub 94 PP
  • 2013 Ellergrub 93+ PP

We are very proud of the just released Parker Points for our 2013 vintage.

bewertungen

The Saatchi Gallery in combination with fantastic wineries from all over the world created a special day for all visitors. Even we could not resist temptation and took some time to try some of the many wines from our fellow winemakers.

We hope to see you soon in Enkirch or at the Prowein fair in Düsseldorf on March, 15-17th. Our whole team including Fay, Gernot, Roland, Ute and Volker will be in Düsseldorf on the 16th of March.

New Parker Ratings Vintage 2011 »

David Schildknecht via www.erobertparker.com:

Gernot Kollmann picked most of his best parcels in the third week of October, although botrytis pressure forced him to attack some vines earlier. Even with such a relatively late harvest and a vintage this ripe, he has been able to bottle wines with finished alcohol between 12-12,5%, in keeping with a continued goal of achieving levity. Vine age, genetic diversity, and lack of grafts have much to do, in Kollmann’s (and many another Mosel vintner’s) view, with their fruit ripening at relatively low must weights. These wines display the sort of balance thal long-time (and last family) proprietor Georg Immich adored, although I regret that one certainly cannot credit as prohpetic his belief that halbtrocken would, before the last century was out, become the sensible and aesthetically norm among “dry” German Rieslings! (Perhaps one day still, though.) He has managed to secure significant numbers of wholesome used barrels of 300-liter capacity, substituting these increasingly for classic 225-liter barriques; but reports that, sadly, he cannot locate suitable used 500- or 600-liter demi-muids nor, for the time being, afford to introduce newly constructed fuders on the classic Mosel model. (For more on the recent evolution – indeed, veritable resurrection – of this venerable estate, please consult my reports in issues 199 and 192. The first, strikingly delicious Chardonnay-dominated wine has appeared from Weingut Rinke’s dramatically-steep and -restored mussel-chalk terraces on the Upper Mosel, a Kollmann project about which I’ll write further in future, though that arguably belongs in the context of covering neighboring Luxemburg, or even Champagne.)

Imported by Louis/Dressner Selections, New York; tel. (212) 334-8191

2011 Immich-Batterieberg Riesling C A I

A Riesling Dry White Table wine from Enkrich, Middle Mosel, Mosel Saar Ruwer, Germany Review by David Schildknecht eRobertParker.com
# 199 and 192 (April 2013)
Rating: 90

Fifteen in part geographically disparate contract lots informed the 30,000 bottles of Immich-Batterieberg 2011 Riesling Kabinett C.A.I., including – as in 2010 – a majority of Dhronhofberger from Kohl-Staudt Weinhofgut Amtsgarten, considerable Oberemmel and Wiltinger Riesling courtesy of Moritz Gogrewe, plus contibutions from Kinheim, Kröv, Wolf (all near-by) and Enkirch itself. Genuinely dry- though not labeled as such – this is consistent with the standards set by its two predecessors, emphasizing levity, precision of flavor, and genuine interactivty. The vividness and lusciousness of flower-garlanded white peach and lime are every bit as much Mosel archetypes as are this wine’s mouthwatering salinity, wet stone understone, and shimmering sense of transparency to nuances that can only – for lack of any better covering term – be called “mineral.” This exceptional value should serve well for at least the next 3-4 years (The 2010 is even more exciting today than it was a year ago.)

2011 Immich-Batterieberg Riesling Escheburg

A Riesling Medium Dry White Table wine from Enkrich, Middle Mosel, Mosel Saar Ruwer, Germany Review by David Schildknecht eRobertParker.com
# 199 and 192 (April 2013)
Rating: 89

The Immich-Battieberg 2011 Enkircher Riesling Escheburg – a mid-range cuvee drawn on this occasion from around 40% Ellergrub, 40% Batterieberg, and 20% Steffensberg, and not stinting on old, ungrafted vines – is, like the intro-level negociant cuvee “C.A.I.,” legally dry, though not labeled as such. There’s also a rahter austerely stony, ashen understone, which sets-off the tropical ripeness of fruit flavors, favoring melons, passion fruit, mango and peach. Kollmann seeks to assure me that there was no botrytis in this fruit but it was extremly ripe. A slight majority of the vinification was in tank, which may have enhanced freshness but may also have underscored the wine’s austere side. The charm or interactivity and saliva-inducement of the ostensibly lesser “C.A.I.” would be welcome here, too, but this is still an excellent and persistent performance that may with a few years acquire other, compensatory virtues.

2011 Immich-Batterieberg Enkircher Steffensberg Riesling

A Riesling Dry White Table wine from Steffensberg, Enkrich, Middle Mosel, Mosel Saar Ruwer, Germany Review by David Schildknecht eRobertParker.com
# 199 and 192 (April 2013)
Rating: 90+

Drink: 2013 – 2017

Peppermint, cassis, and struck flint pungently inform the nose of Immich-Batterieber’s 2011 Enkircher Steffensberg Riesling; then join hints of spice from barrel as well as grapefruit and kumquat oils in accenting a juicy reserve of white peach. Palpably dense and phenolically pronounced, this, nonetheless, serves for ample refreshment, and its prolonged, wet stone-underlain finish offers a welcome sense of buoyancy. It seems to me quite easy to imagine that were only another half percent of alcohol present, this wine’s bitter elements would be too reinforced and its sense of buoyancy compromised. I am inclined to anticipate this being best drunk over the next 3-4 years. Kollmann cautions me, though, that Steffensberg was more expressive before as well as immediately following bottling than the corresponding wine from the Batterieberg, and that it might well be suffering more from its recent bottling. As for the wine’s pungently reductive cast, I can testify from my experience in the 1980s with Georg Immich’s wines that it is at least partly associated with Steffensberg terroir.

2011 Immich-Batterieberg Enkircher Batterieberg Riesling

A Riesling Dry White Table wine from Batterieberg, Enkrich, Middle Mosel, Mosel Saar Ruwer, Germany.
Review by David Schildknecht eRobertParker.com
# 199 and 192 (April 2013)
Rating: 92

A greenhouse- or florist’s-like amalgam of laefing and flowering things joins with intimations of alkalinity and wet stone in the nose of Immich-Batterieberg’s 2011 Enkircher Battierberg Riesling. Its juicy lemon and lime brightness enlivens a complex matrix of white peach, apricot and crabapple suffused with fruit pit, diverse flower petals, crushed stone, mustard seed and freshly-milled grain on a subtly satiny palate. This finishes with lift and shimmeringly interactive intensity of floral, herbal, fruit and mineral components. I would expect it to perform well for a least 15 years.

2011 Immich-Batterieberg Enkircher Ellergrub Riesling

A Riesling Dry White Table wine from Ellergrub, Enkrich, Middle Mosel, Mosel Saar Ruwer, Germany Review by David Schildknecht eRobertParker.com
# 199 and 192 (April 2013)
Rating: 94

The Immich-Batterieberg 2011 Enkircher Ellergrub Riesling is fascinatingly and alluringly floral, incorporating musky narcissus and peony, chamomile and lavender, as well as sweet scents of honeysuckle and apple blossom. These, along with mint and hints of citrus oils, garland succulently juicy white peach which – like the impression of liquid floral perfume itself – is beautifully underscored by a subtle hint of sweetness from 17 grams of residual sugar on a seductively silken yet invigorantingly juicy palate. A cyanic hint of peach kernel, nutty bitter sweetness of almond, kiss of wet stone, and saliva-drawing salinity help intriguingly extend a buoyant, kaleidoscopically-interactive, and refreshing finish. This beauty should dazzle for at least two decades.

2011 Immich-Batterieberg Enkircher Zeppwingert Riesling

Riesling Dry White Table wine from Zeppwingert, Enkrich, Middle Mosel, Mosel Saar Ruwer, Germany.
Review by David Schildknecht eRobertParker.com
# 199 and 192 (April 2013)
Rating: 93

From old vines immediately adjacent to the Batterieberg yet always giving distinctly different vinous results, the 2011 Enkircher Zeppwingert Riesling is the only “dry” wine in its collection whose fruit was influenced by botrytis. Quince, white peach and bittersweet liquid floral perfumes cavort against a background of wet stone on a silken, expansive, deeply rich, yet still-refreshing palate, nuances of peach kernel, almond, black tea, and ginseng adding to the dynamically interactive finish of a Riesling that manages to at once sooth and enervate. As one has come to expect from Kollmann, this wine is adroitly-balanced, its 22 grams of residual sugar entirely supportive yet leaving behind only the subtlest impression of sweetness per se. Look for at least two decades of satisfaction.

Weinpräsentation der 2009 Immich-Batterieberg Rieslinge. »

Weinpräsentation der 2009er Immich-Batterieberg Rieslinge

Freitag, 03. September 14:00 bis 19:00 Uhr im Weingut (Vinothek im Hof)

Samstag, 04. September 11:00 bis 19:00 Uhr im Weingut (Vinothek im Hof) mit kleinem Buffet

Grosses Eröffnungsmenü im Jugendstilhotel Bellevue in Traben-Trarbach

Freitag, 03. September, 20:00 Uhr

5 Gang-Menü mit begleitenden reifen und jungen Weinen des Weingutes Immich-Batterieberg und einer Auswahl spannender Weine und Sekte deutscher und französischer Kollegen.

(Insgesamt 12 Weine und ein Sekt)

Oenophile und gastrosophische Seminare und Proben

Samstag, 04. September

12 Uhr – Crustacés de Luxe – eine Ent- und Einführung in die Welt der edlen Krustentiere und Austern mit Mario Turco, der mit seiner Trierer Firma Les Deux die feinsten Häuser im Westen Deutschlands beliefert und der einen unterhaltsamen Einstieg – natürlich mit vielen Kostproben und passenden Weinen – in die Welt der bekannten und unbekannten, gepanzerten Meeresbewohner gibt.

14 Uhr – die Metamorphose der Milch – eine Entdeckungsreise und ein Einführungsseminar in die Welt der edlen Rohmilchkäse Frankreichs und der Eifel mit Thorsten Glöde, Hotel Hohenzollern, Ahrweiler, der sein Haus in den letzten Jahren zu einer der lohnensten Zieladressen für Freunde feinster, reifer Käse gemacht hat – passende Weine gibt es natürlich auch.

16 Uhr – Spur der Steine – eine oenologische Wanderung durch die feinsten Lagen Burgunds und eine Hommage an den Pinot Noir Wolfgang Kern, Wein-Kern, Aachen öffnet seinen Keller und führt mit seiner Auswahl reifer, sehr traditionell gemachter Burgunder durch die Pinot-Welt, mit einem besonderen Blick auf die Lagenunterschiede, dem Punkt an dem sich Burgund und die Mosel besonders nah sind.

Konzert und Wiedereröffnungsparty im Weingut Immich-Batterieberg

Samstag, 04. September, ab 20:00 Uhr

Jetzt ist schön – Konzert mit dem Michy Reincke Akustik Trio. Michy Reincke, begleitet von Stephan Gade und Mirko Michalzik, präsentiert das Programm seiner letzten CD Jetzt ist schön (2009) und die bekannten Stücke seiner ersten Band Felix de Luxe (Taxi nach Paris, Nächte übers Eis…).

Er singt und erzählt von den einfachen und komplizierteren Dingen des Lebens auf seine eigene, lebendige, sentimentale, humorvolle und kluge Art und entwirft ein Bild eines offenen und leidenschaftlichen Weges aus der Dunkelheit durchs Licht, von einer Ewigkeit in die nächste …

Nach dem Konzert wird weitergefeiert mit kleinem Buffet und den neuen Immich-Batterieberg Weinen.

Probe grosser Rhoneweine des Jahrgangs 1995. »

Ein Dank geht erst mal an Lars Carlberg, der uns diese Probe freundlicherweise aus seinem Privatkeller gestiftet hat – viele der Weine sind ja kaum noch zu bekommen und teilweise exorbitant teuer geworden. So profitieren wir davon, daß die Rhone, neben der Mosel, seine zweite Leidenschaft ist und er diese Weine nicht verfrüht und, noch schlimmer, ohne uns getrunken hat.

In Vorfreude auf einen sehr guten Jahrgang, eher klassische Ausbaustile (mit wenig bis keinem neuen Holz) und ausreichend Käse und Wildschwein haben wir uns im Batterieberg zusammengefunden.

Zu den Weinen. Zum Warmlaufen.

1995er Hermitage blanc, Chave

Rhone-Weiß gehört wirklich nicht zu meinen großen Leidenschaften, aber hier muss ich wirklich zugestehen, dieser Wein ist enorm komplex und mineralisch, am Anfang schon recht nussig, etwas Akazienhonig, schöne Würze, gewinnt immer mehr an Tiefe und Ausdruck. Besonders nach der Rotweinprobe mit 3h Luft zeigt dieser Wein, daß er zur ersten Liga gehört.

Die Roten

1995er Cornas, Auguste Clape

leider Kork, ich habe eine recht aktuelle, gute Beschreibung im Netz gefunden, so daß der Wein doch noch zu Ehren kommt:

Chris Kissack via www.thewinedoctor.com:

“In view of these thoughts and comments I thought I should take a look at this wine, the 1995 Cornas from Auguste Clape. Contrary to Robinson’s opinion, Rhone guru John Livingstone-Learmonth seems to rate the estate very highly, and finds this wine to have particular appeal, citing a ‘drink by’ date of 2020-2025, so this is a very early look at this wine. It has a fine dark colour, a vibrant yet deep red core, fading a little at the edges, but not showing a hint of bricky age, merely a softening of its original dark hue. The nose is a little reticent, but carries a lot of reserved fruit, with a very stony and mineral character, plus a little ash, plum skin and cherry skin too. It is loaded with character but not in a plump, flattering or fleshy manner, it has more of a savage, brooding style. A lovely weight on entry, very firm and well knit together, with firm tannins at the finish coated in more ash. A sinewy texture, hard-nosed but not mean or wiry. In fact it remains rather austere in a way. A good length too, with a little cigar here. This is full of promise. With a little more time it opens out and broadens through the midpalate, and softens by just the faintest touch to coat the palate, but it never really relaxes in the mouth. This is a wine of gravitas which needs another five years, if not another ten. I am very glad this is my first bottle, and not my last. 18.5+/20(28/1/08) …”

Als Korkersatz ein Pirat (sowohl Jahrgang, als auch Herkunft).

1996er Faugères “Jadis”, Leon Barral

Kraftvoll, mit gut integriertem Holz und schöner Sruktur wäre dieser Wein ein Star vieler Proben – gäbe es nicht die Konkurenz. Im Vergleich zu den besten Herkünften der Rhone ohne Chance, bleibt etwas einfach, ohne die mehrdimensionale Tiefe eines Spitzenweines.

Zurück zur Rhone

1995er Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Chateau Rayas

Sehr klassische Art, Amarenakirschen, große Tiefe und Struktur, dabei trotzdem fein und ausgewogen, den mächtigen Körper gut tragend, für mich einer der grossen Vier der Probe.

1995er Hermitage, Chave

Große Feinheit und Eleganz, gleichzeitig geschliffen und wild, feinste Tanninstruktur der Runde, rotes Fleisch, toll, großer Wein!

1995er Trévallon, Provence

Differenzierte Frucht, Feinheit, Festigkeit, fehlt etwas die edle Art, Cabernet kommt etwas kratzig, reicht nicht an die Feinheit der Top-Bordeaux und an die Tiefe der besten Rhone dieser Runde.

1995er Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Chateau de Beaucastel

Feine Säure, recht differenziert, gute Balance, aber es fehlt ein wenig an Tiefe und Ausdruck, nur gute Mittelklasse.

1995er Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Le Vieux Donjon

Marzipan, rund und Tief, recht Komplett wirkend, die Hitzigkeit macht ihn etwas zu derb, guter Essensbegleiter.

1995er Chateauneuf-du-Pape “Réserve des Célestins”, Henri Bonneau

Tolle Struktur und Dichte, für die Wucht noch recht elegant, sehr jung, vielschichtig und lang, sehr guter Wein.

1995er Chateauneuf-du-Pape “Cuvée Laurence”, Domaine de Pegau

Streichholz, Fleisch, für Pegau recht elegante Frucht, trotzdem noch der Rest Wildheit die wir uns von diesem Weingut wünschen (wir warten aufs Wildschwein), sehr gut!

1998er(!) Chateauneuf-du-Pape “La Crau”, Vieux Télégraphe

Tiefer Kaffe, Süße, wirkt etwas moderner / fruchtbetonter als die 1995er, sehr guter , vielschichtiger Wein aus toller Lage, wird etwas durch die Hitzigkeit eingebremst, sehr jung.

… endlich Schwein und Käse, mit gereiften Moselweine wieder wach trinken, in die Tiefen der Weinbaupolitik eintauchen, die Argumente gewinnen an Tiefe, Schärfe, fast schwebend, 3 Uhr …

Danke Lars!

Another article on moselwinemerchant.com »

Article via www.moselwinemerchant.com

In late December, I was invited to an impressive back-vintage tasting of diverse Mosel Riesling at Weingut Günther Steinmetz in Brauneberg. Because I foolishly discarded my scribbled notes, I cannot recall all the fine details of the event, but here’s what I did remember:

After all the bottles had been carefully uncorked and lined up, we began with two 1971s, a highly sought-after vintage (and my birth year!), and worked back through the decades to a 1921 Piesporter. Several of the wines, including a 1971 Graacher Himmelreich (Bergweiler-Prüm), 1952 Brauneberger Juffer-Sonnenuhr (Ferdinand Haag), and several Wehlener (1940 Lay, 1938 Rosenberg, and 1937), were sourced from a cellar in Mülheim. The Steinmetzes had vintages from the early sixties and late fifties on hand. And Gernot Kollmann, who now runs Immich-Batterieberg, had brought six different vintages directly from the estate’s cellar in Enkirch.

The 1971 Graacher was oxidized, but the ’71 Enkircher Ellergrub from Immich was in fine form with surprisingly bright acidity. We followed these two with a 1967 Eitelsbacher Karthäuserhofberger Sang Spätlese, which was unfortunately showing oxidation as well. In the 1960s Weingut Karthäuserhof had some remarkable bottlings known for their warmth and generosity, not the terms most often associated with the estate’s wines today, but sadly we couldn’t get a good look at the wine through the oxidation here. (For a period of time up until the mid 1980s, Karthäuserhof had bottled their wines from the iron-rich Karthäuserhofberg according to five former place-names: Burgberg, Kronenberg, Orthsberg, Sang, and Stirn.)

Although there was an occasional off-putting bottle or wines simply past their prime, the tasting revealed some real gems. Stefan Steinmetz’s father, Günther, who joined us for the occasion, made his first wine as a 17-year-old in 1958. And we were fortunate to taste a bottle from this vintage: a 1958 Brauneberger Mandelgraben naturrein from Willi Steinmetz. (On old labels naturrein means literally “naturally pure,’ and was the pre-1971 Wine Law term for a non-chaptalized wine before today’s Prädikat system, which had created Kabinett to go along with Spätlese, Auslese, and so forth. Willi Steinmetz was the former name of Weingut Günther Steinmetz.). In those early years, until the sterile filter became readily available to more small growers, he produced mostly dry Riesling. In addition to the ’58 Mandelgraben, we were treated to his ’59 Brauneberger Hasenläufer Auslese and a ’60 Brauneberger Juffer naturrein. All three were still exquisite and vibrant. One of my favorites was the 1960 Juffer, which had less than 2 grams per liter residual sugar. It was an absolutely stunning bottle of Mosel Riesling, especially from a “lesser’ vintage.

Among the other highlights was a ’64 Enkircher Batterieberg Auslese from Immich-Batterieberg. As with the 1953 Ellergrub (no Prädikat), both had been recorked at the domaine, which surely made them taste differently and younger than had they not been recorked. On the other hand, the oldest vintages-1949 and 1938 Batterieberg-still had original corks and were strikingly youthful, an incredible sign of just how long Mosel Riesling can age.

Vorläufiger 2009er Jahrgangsbericht. »

Unser “erster” Jahrgang mit neuem Team zeigt, dass schwierige Umstände oft zu Gutem führen können. Die Vegetationsperiode fing erst ganz “harmlos” mit einem warmen Frühling, und daraus resultierend einem extrem frühen Austrieb an, auf den eine ebenso frühe Blüte folgte. In die Blüte hinein brach das Wetter förmlich zusammen, mit Starkregen und einem großen Temperatursturz, mit der Folge einer sehr langen Blütezeit und vielen einzelnen unbefruchteten Beeren (was sich Qualitätsfördernd zu einer extrem kleine Ernte mit unter 35 hl/ha entwickelt hat) und einem zeitlich deutlich differierendem Entwicklungsstand der Trauben (selbst an einem gemeinsamen Trieb). Daraufhin machte uns auch der Frühsommer erhebliche Sorgen, da wir über einige Wochen fast täglich mit einer fast tropischen Situation konfrontiert wurden, tagsüber warm, am späten Nachmittag ausgiebiger Regen, so dass die Reben fast jeden Tag mit nassen Blättern, aber hohen Temperaturen “ins Bett” gehen mussten. Die daraufhin zu befürchtenden Probleme haben uns dann aber überraschend milde getroffen.

Doch was den Pilzen Freude macht, befördert auch die restliche Vegetation, so dass sich im Spätsommer eine sehr frühe Ernte ankündigte, die durch einen, wie maßgeschneiderten, sonnigen Herbst mit kühlen Nächten, dem Jahrgang die nötige Vollendung brachte und in dem wir, auch mit etwas Glück, am Vorabend eines neu eintreffenden Tiefdruckgebietes auf den Punkt mit der Lese fertig geworden sind.

Die Mostgewichte lagen im Schnitt bei perfekten 95° Öchsle mit einigen edelsüßen Ergänzungen und wir freuen uns über eine reife, milde, aber prägnante Säure. Im frühen, noch hefetrüben Stadium, präsentieren die Jungweine eine exotische Frucht und eine deutliche, fast salzige Mineralität.

Erster Jahrgang mit neuem Team. »

Unser “erster” Jahrgang mit neuem Team zeigt, dass schwierige Umstände oft zu Großem führen können. Die Vegetationsperiode fing erst ganz “harmlos” mit einem warmen Frühling, und daraus resultierend einem extrem frühen Austrieb an, auf den eine ebenso frühe Blüte folgte.

In die Blüte hinein brach das Wetter förmlich zusammen, mit Starkregen und einem großen Temperatursturz, mit der Folge einer sehr langen Blütezeit und vielen einzelnen unbefruchteten Beeren und einem zeitlich deutlich differierendem Entwicklungsstand der Trauben (selbst an einem gemeinsamen Trieb).

Daraufhin machte uns auch der Sommer erhebliche Sorgen, da wir über einige Wochen fast täglich mit einer fast tropischen Situation konfrontiert wurden, tagsüber warm, am späten Nachmittag ausgiebiger Regen, so dass die Reben fast jeden Tag mit nassen Blättern “ins Bett” gehen mussten.

Die daraufhin zu befürchtenden Pilzkrankheiten haben uns dann aber nur recht milde getroffen. Was den Pilzen Freude macht, befördert auch die restliche Vegetation, so dass sich im Spätsommer eine sehr frühe Ernte ankündigte, die durch einen perfekten, sonnigen Herbst mit kalten Nächten, dem Jahrgang die nötige Vollendung brachte.

Die Mostgewichte lagen im Schnitt bei perfekten 95° Öchsle mit einigen edelsüßen Ergänzungen und wir freuen uns über eine reife, milde, aber ausreichende Säure.

Im aktuellen Stadium – alle Weine sind noch in der Gärung – zeigen sich die Moste fest und ausdrucksvoll mit einer recht exotischen Frucht – wir sind gespannt.